John's Gospel recorded only seven miracles, and John called them signs.

Sunday, 4/23/17

St. John concluded his Gospel by saying, "Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples that are not recorded here. But these have been written that you my come to believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, so that through that belief you may have life in his name."

While the other three Gospels tell the stories of manny, many miracles, John recorded only seven of them. He said that by accepting those seven we might come to believe that Jesus is the Christ, and that through believing in him we can have life.

If you look at the seven signs one by one you an see how they testify to who Jesus was, and you will see how they signified the life he gives us.

Three of the signs were hearings: of the man bon blind, af the centurion's son, of the paralytic by the pool at Bethesda. In addition there was the changing water into wine, the walking on the water, the feeding five thousand and the raising of Lazarus. Each of them indicates that Jesus is the Messiah and that we have life by believing in him.

We can't explain everything.

Saturday, 4/22/17

There are puzzling aspects about Our Lord’s appearances after his resurrection.

One thing to puzzle over was the way he would come and go, leaving us to wonder where he was in the meantime.

Another puzzling thing is the question as to why old friends, without recognizing him, needed to be told “It is the Lord.”

The risen Jesus ate some fish to show that he had a real body. But we are still left wondering how his body dealt with the bit of fish they gave him. 

Shakespeare has us throwing up our hands, saying, “There are more things in heaven and on earth Horatio, than are dreamed of in your philosophies. ”
 

Today was my dad's birthday.

Friday, 4/21/17

It’s okay for us to preach about a saint, even though he’s not canonized. My dad was born on this April 21, away  back in 1887, and he merited being mentioned from the altar. His father saved up money working in a shop in Limerick, and tried to make a go of it with a similar shop in St. Louis; but he died in 1894, forcing my dad to quit the Second Grade to support his mother and younger brother and sister.

Working as the delivery boy for Mrs. Rump’s candy store, in between runs he pumped the city’s first player piano. It delighted him that people thought he was a child prodigy. He next became a delivery boy for Western Union, and by age fifteen he had mastered their code, and he learned how to type fast with two fingers.

My mother had got passed the fourth grade when she got on at Western Union as a telegraph operator. From the time they were married in 1913 they brought dad’s mother and sister in to stay with them, even after they had six kids of their own.

Working weekends to make the payments, dad bought a two story house. I want to read a poem he wrote about us all coming home to it in 1940 when I was twelve; and I want to read another poem he wrote for my mother in 1970, when she was in a nursing home.

Our liturgists have changed the tenses of Our Lord's words at the Last Supper.

Thursday, 4/19/17

Let me say something about how the composers of our Eucharistic liturgies seems to have changed the Bible readings for the Mass.

They have been intent on our seeing our Mass as a repetition of Our Lord’s sacrifice on the cross, and to emphasize that, they have changed the tenses of the Our Lord’s words a the Last Supper.

In the Bible accounts Jesus said, “This is my body which is offered for you,” and, “This is the chalice of my blood which is poured out for you.”

But in our Eucharistic prayers they have changed that to, “This is my body which will be offered up for you,” and, “This is the chalice of my blood which will be poured out for you.”

The liturgist are right in seeing Our Lord’s sacrifice as being completed on the cross, but they are wrong in ignoring the fact that his sacrifice began at the Last Supper.


Jesus, as the host at the Last Supper, led the Apostles in a traditional formal blessing known as the Berakah; and its three parts were always the Anamnesis, the Epiclesis, and the Eucharistia. In English that would be the Calling God’s blessings to Mind Prayer, the Calling God down Prayer, and the Pleasing Gift Prayer.  

St. Augustan in 400 was to say, that the worshippers, united with Jesus as one pleasing gift (one Eucharist) is what made the Last Supper and our Mass a sacrifice.

In the First Century, when Christians came together to worship on Sundays, they followed a handbook called “The Teaching of the Apostles.”  It told them, “Begin by confessing your sins so that your sacrifice may be pure: and if you have a difference with your neighbor, be reconciled so that it does not harm your sacrifice.”

St. Paul and t. Luke told us that it was at the Pleasing Gift part of the Last Supper that Jesus took the bread, blessed it, and gave it. His single purpose was that we might be physically part of one Pleasing Gift with him.

To make the Mass our sacrifice we must be giving God all our obedience and all our love. In doing that we are one with Jesus who is giving the Father all his obedience and love. We are making ourselves one Eucharist with Jesus.


Jesus, as the host at the Last Supper, led the Apostles in a traditional formal blessing known as the Berakah; and its three parts were always the Anamnesis, the Epiclesis, and the Eucharistia. In English that would be the Calling to mind God’s blessings, the Calling God down Prayer, and the Pleasing Gift Prayer.  

St. Augustan in 400 was to say, that the worshippers, united with Jesus as one pleasing gift (one Eucharist) is what made the Last Supper and our Mass a sacrifice.

In the First Century, when Christians came together to worship on Sundays, they followed a handbook called “The Teaching of the Apostles.”  It told them, “Begin by confessing your sins so that your sacrifice may be pure: and if you have a difference with your neighbor, be reconciled so that it does not harm your sacrifice.”

St. Paul and t. Luke told us that it was at the Pleasing Gift part of the Last Supper that Jesus took the bread, blessed it, and gave it. His single purpose was that we might be physically part of one Pleasing Gift with him.

To make the Mass our sacrifice we must be giving God all our obedience and all our love. In doing that we are one with Jesus who is giving the Father all his obedience and love. We are making ourselves one Eucharist with Jesus.